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The same year efforts were made to grow rice, but with little success. During the years 1804-5 Governor King proclaimed the following Commons in the district:— Ham Common. Later Trustees for Ham Common were: Abraham Cornwell, Robert Fitzgerald, George Bowman. A school was also established at an early period, situated near South Creek, just behind the Court House. The residents took an interest in the affairs of the colony in those early days. He was presented with a large puree of sovereigns, subscribed by all denominations. This he carried on at Scotland Island, near Newport, at the mouth of the Hawkesbury.

Some good cedar trees were growing in the district, and settlers were prohibited from cutting them, as the Government claimed them all. Thomas Arndell and Charles Grimes, Deputy Surveyor, were appointed resident magistrates in 1802. Grimes left the district in 1803, and was succeeded by Surveyor G. Trustees: William Cox, John Bowman, Andrew Thompson, Edward Tutterill, William Minchin. Trustees: Andrew Thompson, Thomas Biggars, Thomas Tyler. As will be seen on reference to the articles on "Schools and Churches" elsewhere, divine service was held at the Hawkesbury by Rev. A covered waggon began to ply three times a week between Windsor and Sydney, starting on 9th February, 1805. An address was presented by them to the Senior Chaplain, Rev. Marsden, on the occasion of his visiting England in 1807. A big flood in Maitland in 1875 called forth the sympathy of the Windsor residents, who subscribed one hundred and ten pounds for the relief fund. It is said that he also had an illicit distillery here. Biggars got a similar reward at the same time, spirits in those days, as was well-known, being a medium of exchange.

Baker afterwards kept an hotel in Baker Street, known as the Royal Oak. On account of distress caused by floods the Governor curtailed the sale of rum during the year 1798. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806, to sell at a shilling a gallon, and small beer sixpence.

The old Government House was also built about this time as a residence for Lieutenant Edward Abbott, commander of the troops for the N. About the year 1800 there appeared on the Hawkesbury a settler named Andrew Thompson, who played a leading part in the development of the district up to the time of his death in 1810. His brewery was situated on the bank of the South Creek. Hughes (who was the schoolmaster at Richmond, and formerly at Windsor), R.

The Articles have been the subject of considerable correspondence, both in the local paper and direct to the author. Henry Selkirk, of the Lands Department, and for several years a kindly neighbour in Killara. The following year many more families were settled, and as the natives were troublesome, some troops from the N. It is of interest to note that Lieutenant Grose was the son of Captain Grose, concerning whose peregrinations through Scotland the poet Burns wrote: A chiel's amang you takin' notes, And faith he'll print it. The Grants from the year 1800 to 1804 were as follows—Thomas Hobby, William Bates, Lydia Austen, Charles Marsden (900 acres), William Ezzy (130 acres), Henry Cox, and Andrew Thompson. The bat of missing books is given, which includes such standard works as Milton, Burns, Sterne, Thomson, Hervey and others. The foundation stones of this church were laid by Rev.

By this means valuable revisions and additions have been made. "I have read the articles on the 'Early Days of Windsor', by the Rev. "As a native of Windsor, with a clear recollection of the past seventy-five years, I may say that the author has spared no pains to make his statements accurate and reliable. The earliest Hawkesbury Crown grants included those to Samuel Wilcox, John Brindley, William Bond, John Ruffler, Alexander Wilson, and Whaelen. Thomas Westmore and William Anderson, James Ruse, Ann Blady and Joseph Smallwood, in 1797. These may be easily located on the map of the Parish of St. The grants for the same period made near Pitt Town were:—Messrs. A Government order, dated 8th April, 1804, ordered that all boats trading on the Hawkesbury River should be numbered and registered by Andrew Thompson, head constable, otherwise they would be confiscated.

This tour occupied the time from 6th November to 13th December, 1810:— "The frequent inundations of the rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean having been hitherto attended with the most calamitous effects, with regard to crops growing in their vicinity, and in consequence of most serious injury to the necessary subsistence of the colony, the Governor has deemed it expedient (in order to guard as far as human foresight can extend against the recurrence of such calamities), to erect certain townships in the most contiguous and eligible high grounds in the several districts subjected to those inundations for the purpose of rendering every possible accommodation and security to the settlers whose farms are exposed to the floods. It is probably the building still standing behind the police barracks. West's House are on a small scale, and the latter in a very dilapidated state." "Court House (with plan).—The building is so badly executed that tho' it has not been built two years, strong settlements are showing themselves in the walls and ceilings, and the interior accommodations are not at all adapted for the purpose intended, as the plan will show." "General Observations.—The author of this report, etc., etc., would advert to the expensive and insufficient plan pursued in making and repairing bridges—the one now re-building at Windsor is a proof of this assertion, for instead of throughing over a stout truss'd and framed wooden bridge of one arch (which from the bold situation of the banks might have been done at little more cost than what is now expended) the same principle is still followed as that at first introduced into the colon; by placing piles in the sides and bed of the river, which collect all the rubbish continually floating down, and in the event of a flood must unavoidably destroy every bridge so constructed." With regard to this report we may say that the Court House stands to-day strong and solid, and in constant use, and likely to last for many years to come. Matthew's Church, but it seems as strong and hard to-day as it was ninety years ago. On 10th August, 1829, the first Circuit Court was opened in Windsor by Judge Stephen. John Howe, in December, 1809, he having had on sale "Woollens, drapery, and all sorts of lines." Governor Macquarie landed in New South Wales 28th December, 1809, and took over the administration of affaire of the colony 1st January, 1810, from Lieutenant Governor Foveaux, and on 12th January, 1810, less than a fortnight after his arrival, Governor Macquarie made Andrew Thompson a Justice of the Peace, and appointed him as Chief Magistrate for the district of the Hawkesbury.

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Governor Bligh, and his son-in-law, Captain Putland, had farms near Pitt Town, where Bligh's oaks may still be seen. From this it appears that he obtained four hundred gallons of spirits which he retailed at a profit of twelve hundred pounds. His town residence in Sydney was in Macquarie Place. At another meeting to consider local grievances, John Bowman, Matthew Gibbons, and William Cummins were also present. Evans, William Baker, Thomas Arndell, Samuel Solomon and Andrew Thompson.

Errors there may be, but every effort has been made to verify the data. "His work will supply a felt want, in the literature of Windsor, and it should prove very acceptable to all lovers of the Hawkesbury districts. Stogdell, Palmer, Hobbs, Diggers, Jones, Benn, Smallwood, Dr. The present township of Pitt Town stands on portions of these grants, which had to be resumed for township purposes in 1810. A Government store was established in 1798, and placed in charge of William Baker, whose name is perpetuated in Baker Street, Windsor and Baker's Lagoon, near Richmond. In the year 1804 Governor King appointed trustees for the several Commons of the Colony. Everingham (a Matthew James Everingham died on 25th December, 1817, aged forty-eight years, and was buried in St.